Serving the Track Maintenance needs of the Midwest since 1987

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railroad track contractor with his boot on the railroad tracks
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How to Choose a Railroad Contractor

There’s little room for error for a railroad contractor in the world of railroad construction.

Choosing the wrong midwest railroad contractor puts you at risk for delays, needless expenses or even lackluster safety standards.

Whether you’re looking for someone to construct a new piece of track or repair an existing railway, it’s crucial you look for someone with the expertise and reputation to suit your needs.

Here are five questions you should ask when searching for a midwest railroad contractor.

  1. Are they experienced?

One of the first things to look for is whether the contractor’s experience lines up with the requirements of your project.

Try to get a sense of the methodology they use to manage projects and the type of work they’ve done with companies like yours in the past.

Ask them about their project success rate, their track record for concluding projects on time and within budget. Find out their criteria for communication. Will they provide regular updates and detailed reports? Finally, ask if they have their own specialized equipment.

  1. Are they safe?

Railroad construction and repair can be dangerous, which is why it’s vital to pick a midwest railroad contractor who closely follows industry safety standards and who keeps their workers up to date on safety protocols.

The contractor will be responsible for making sure their employees and work sites are safe, but it’s still in your best interest to see that work is done to the highest safety standards to ensure the project passes inspection.

  1. How is their environmental record?

Like all transportation work, railroad construction projects need to meet the standards set by government environmental policies.

That’s why it’s important to choose a contractor who can effectively deal with possible environmental incidents and perform remedial actions to protect the environment. Look for a provider that has a long record of environmental sustainability.

  1. Can they think on their feet?

In a perfect world, every railroad construction or repair project would go off without a hitch. But there’s no way to predict things like extreme weather events.

What if flash flooding causes a subsidence near one of your bridges? What if a snowstorm closes down construction?

You need a midwest railroad contractor who can respond to these issues when they occur. Look for someone who can offer a range of services, not only construction but also design, maintenance and inspections.

Look for someone with local expertise. A railroad contractor who’s only done work in, say, Arizona may not be familiar with dealing with midwestern winters.

  1. What do other people say about them?

A dependable railroad contractor is one who won’t mind turning over their references. Speaking to their past clients is the simplest way to get a sense of what it will be like to work with them.

Once you’ve made contact with these references, ask them things like: Did they understand your needs? Were you satisfied with their overall work? Were they responsive to questions and requests? Did they meet safety and/or environmental regulations? And perhaps most importantly, would you work with them again?

We like to think our clients would answer yes to those questions. As a premiere midwest railroad contractor, R&S Track has spent nearly 30 years helping businesses who needed:

We have a 100 percent track record of customer satisfaction and are happy to provide references. Contact us at 402-564-1801 for service inquiries and price estimates.

train crash derailment
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How to Prevent Train Derailment

If you’re a Nebraska railroad contractor, the idea of a train derailment is frightening, which is why it’s important to know how to prevent train derailment.

When a train derails, it’s the type of thing that makes the news, often with footage of emergency responders, survivors walking around in a daze.

But in truth, train derailments that lead to injuries are very rare, as most trains in America carry freight rather than passengers, and train cars are designed to survive impacts.

Writing in his book Train Wreck: The Foresnics of Rail Disasters, George Bibel says:

Most derailments are relatively benign, and can be compared to a person walking down the street, tripping, getting back up, and continuing on her or his way. Unless derailed cars crash into houses, strike passenger trains, or release hazardous material into a neighborhood, derailments do not normally affect civilians.

In addition, train derailments are becoming less and less common over the past 40 years due to upgrades in track technology.

Still, that doesn’t mean that track safety and efficiency isn’t something Nebraska railroad contractors should ignore.

Here are a few steps you can take to help prevent derailments.

  1. Inspect your tracks

Every inch of track in your facility should undergo a quarterly inspection by a Nebraska railroad contractor who is qualified to perform inspections.

You should perform regular, consistent maintenance on rail infrastructure and instruct your team on how to spot hazards and defects along the tracks.

  1. Wide gauge tracks

Maintaining the correct width between rails — otherwise known as “gauge” — is important to ensuring safe conditions.

The standard gauge is 56.5 inches. Anything beyond this width is known as wide gauge and may lead to derailments. You can inspect your lines for a wide gauge track by looking for loose or missing bolts and joint bars.

In addition, you should keep an eye out for broken railroad ties, spikes that have come loose or gone missing, or tie plates that have cut into the ties.

Check for places where mud is sitting atop the ballas, which could signal a feeble foundation and improper drainage.

Look for broken switch points, as these can put a gap between the rail and point and allow the wheels of a car to move along the wrong track.

Finally, look for signs of flagging structural integrity (poor spike quantity or tie conditions) that could lead to a buckled or rolled rail.

Preventing sideswipes

Stopping sideswipes in your facility can help guard against derailments. Sideswipes can happen when rail cars are allowed to go past their clearance points and workers don’t know the tracks are obstructed.

You can prevent these incidents with clearance cone markers, which indicate where cars can be spotted without blocking an adjacent track. It’s also a good idea to paint two railroad ties 15 feet back along the cones.

R&S Track Maintenance: Expert Nebraska railroad contractor

For more than 30 years, companies seeking safe, efficient rail services have turned to R&S Track Maintenance, a Nebraska railroad contractor who provides far more than rail maintenance and railroad construction.

Our services include surveying, consulting, track maintenance and repair, and inspections. Our experts know what red flags to look for and can recommend the steps you’ll need to take to prevent train derailment. Contact us today to learn more.

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Rail Service Between Seattle and Tacoma Dates Back More Than a Century

Anyone with a working knowledge of local history of rail service will remember that Tacoma outpaced the backwater of Seattle during the 1870s, particularly after the Northern Pacific Railroad selected the City of Destiny as the terminus for its transcontinental railroad in 1873.

Seattle feared that it would be cut off from the rest of the economic boom in the growing West Coast if it didn’t have rail service to bring settlers – and their dollars – to the Emerald City and to shuttle its lumber and products to markets back East. That changed when Henry Villard gained controlling shares of the Northern Pacific and pledge to run rails between Tacoma and Seattle, where he just happened to have significant real estate holdings he was interested in selling.

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Norfolk Southern rail bridge collapses in Missouri flooding

According to the Railway Track and Structures (RT&S) website, Norfolk Southern has suspended service in Missouri between Moberly and Kansas City. The bridge and track weight capacity on this stretch is 286,000 pounds. The Class 1 railroad issued a service alert saying that it is “working with our interline partners to detour freight traffic over alternative gateways. Customers with traffic operating to and from the Kansas City area should expect a 48- to 72-hour delay.”

Debris and high flood waters have been issues for the past several days near the Grand River Bridge in Brunswick, Missouri. National Weather Service (NWS) Flood Warnings, housed inside the FreightWaves SONAR Critical Events platform, remain posted along the Missouri River. A Twitter video shows the bridge dropping into the river on the evening of October 2. The NWS Missouri Basin River forecast center tweeted earlier today, October 3, that backwater from debris caused the Brunswick gauge to rise.